actor in front of greenscreen

How To Wrangle Your Boss

Pity the poor executive, sitting in their office, busily working away, when you come to the door knocking.

“Boss. It’s time to make the video, the crew is waiting for you,” you say.

The time has been set aside on the calendar for their direct participation in the new corporate video. They have paid it some mind, but now they must really shift gears and quickly get up to speed. Downstairs in the boardroom, there is a full camera crew, other key staff people...all waiting for the boss---To Perform!

This may be something the boss has never done before (or not in a long time). This is different than a speech at a hall or a meeting in the boardroom. What’s the plan? Are they going to wing it?

We look up to our bosses and expect a lot from them. In turn they look to the staff to make things happen and support them. Having a fuller understanding of how events like this come together will go a long way to making this a success.

Tips for the Wrangler

In Hollywood productions, a 'wrangler' is the person assigned to handle any animals used in a film, keep them calm, and get a good performance out of them. In this case, you need a boss wrangler. The boss needs your help to get this right and without any unnecessary learning curve. Your responsibility to prepare them starts immediately;

  • Book time for warm-up. Even racecars need time to get up to speed. Understand that the boss has many shifting priorities. Their mindset is likely emails or conference calls or meetings. Jumping in front of a camera will require some transition time and this is time that needs to be put on the calendar. As well, this warm-up need not (and should not) occur in front of cameras. Prep can occur in the boss’ office, but may be better in a neutral space like a reserved meeting room to save from distractions. It can be the day before or the block of time right before going on camera. Just book it. They will thank you for it.
  • Script or messages. The boss knows the topic and sells the content all day long. A script may unnaturally encourage memorization, a skill that actors work at their entire careers. The best performances come when they know their content through key messages they know to be important for the organization and the video. They will then use their own words to get to the messages. Working this out in front of the camera and under the lights is too late and leads directly to the next point.
  • Haste makes Waste. Book enough time so you are not rushed. Being rushed creates problems. Problems like poor performances. Performances so poor, that they need to be redone and redone in video production always means more money.
  • Casting not Tasking. You have to know for sure that this boss can perform. If you have any doubt then maybe you just don’t do it. There are any number of solutions to delivering messages in a corporate video and having the boss do it is not always a given.

This is not something to “survive” and just “get through” but something to thrive at and have fun with. With effort, planning and practice you’ll be able to get personality and messages to come through loud and clear in your video.

Jon O'Connor

Jon O’Connor is a documentary filmmaker, a corporate communications specialist, and an award-winning video professional.

He is producer emeritus at Toronto Corporate Video Productions.


Share This With Others

Email

Copy and send this link to a friend

https://www.torontocorporatevideo.com/blog/video-production/62-how-to-wrangle-your-boss.html

 

How To Wrangle Your Boss

Pity the poor executive, sitting in their office, busily working away, when you come to the door knocking.

“Boss. It’s time to make the video, the crew is waiting for you,” you say.


The time has been set aside on the calendar for their direct participation in the new corporate video. They have paid it some mind, but now they must really shift gears and quickly get up to speed. Downstairs in the boardroom, there is a full camera crew, other key staff people...all waiting for the boss---To Perform!

This may be something the boss has never done before (or not in a long time). This is different than a speech at a hall or a meeting in the boardroom. What’s the plan? Are they going to wing it?

We look up to our bosses and expect a lot from them. In turn they look to the staff to make things happen and support them. Having a fuller understanding of how events like this come together will go a long way to making this a success.

Tips for the Wrangler

In Hollywood productions, a 'wrangler' is the person assigned to handle any animals used in a film, keep them calm, and get a good performance out of them. In this case, you need a boss wrangler. The boss needs your help to get this right and without any unnecessary learning curve. Your responsibility to prepare them starts immediately;

  • Book time for warm-up. Even racecars need time to get up to speed. Understand that the boss has many shifting priorities. Their mindset is likely emails or conference calls or meetings. Jumping in front of a camera will require some transition time and this is time that needs to be put on the calendar. As well, this warm-up need not (and should not) occur in front of cameras. Prep can occur in the boss’ office, but may be better in a neutral space like a reserved meeting room to save from distractions. It can be the day before or the block of time right before going on camera. Just book it. They will thank you for it.
  • Script or messages. The boss knows the topic and sells the content all day long. A script may unnaturally encourage memorization, a skill that actors work at their entire careers. The best performances come when they know their content through key messages they know to be important for the organization and the video. They will then use their own words to get to the messages. Working this out in front of the camera and under the lights is too late and leads directly to the next point.
  • Haste makes Waste. Book enough time so you are not rushed. Being rushed creates problems. Problems like poor performances. Performances so poor, that they need to be redone and redone in video production always means more money.
  • Casting not Tasking. You have to know for sure that this boss can perform. If you have any doubt then maybe you just don’t do it. There are any number of solutions to delivering messages in a corporate video and having the boss do it is not always a given.

This is not something to “survive” and just “get through” but something to thrive at and have fun with. With effort, planning and practice you’ll be able to get personality and messages to come through loud and clear in your video.

Jon O'Connor

Jon O’Connor is a documentary filmmaker, a corporate communications specialist, and an award-winning video professional.

He is producer emeritus at Toronto Corporate Video Productions.


Share This With Others

Email

Copy and send this link to a friend

https://www.torontocorporatevideo.com/blog/video-production/62-how-to-wrangle-your-boss.html